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Child Neuropsychology A blog by Dr Jonathan Reed
  • How to improve memory

    Neuropsychologists have studied memory for a long time.   We have a clear system of memory classification involving declarative memory which includes episodic memory (memory for events) and semantic memory (memory for facts) and non declarative memory which includes more implicit systems such as procedural memory, classical conditioning and priming.  The neurological substrates of this system are understood.  Numerous case studies of individuals with brain injury and memory disturbance have been reported.   The whole enterprise is best summarised by one of the leading researchers Larry Squire in this excellent paper Memory and brain systems 1969-2009 .

    Yet despite all this knowledge I struggle to see the relevance for the many children I see with memory and learning difficulties.  I was therefore fascinated to read a new book Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer.  Foer’s book is based around a strange group of people who compete in memory championships around the world.  He explains how these competitors memorise the orders of multiple packs of cards, very long strings of digits and long unpublished poems.  The amount of information they can remember is quite remarkable.  Yet Foer shows that these feats are based on some simple memory techniques.  The premise is that human memory evolved to aid survival (finding food and avoiding danger) and therefore is primarily visual and spatial (location based).  He also highlights the way the brain learns and remembers through associations.  The techniques he describes are based on creating an imaginary spatial location (a memory palace) and imagining different visual images which can be associated with what you want to remember in this location.  So for example if you wanted to remember a shopping list you may imagine your home and visualise the first item, which could be milk by imaging someone bathing in milk.  The next item may be fish and you could imagine a singing fish in the kitchen.  The more bizarre the image the better you will recall, hence the title of the book.  By recalling the location and image you can then easily recall the information.   Individuals can create huge memory palaces and remember large amounts of information this way.  Foer believed that these techniques were so powerful that anyone could become a memory champion and he sets out in the book to prove this by entering the US memory championship.  I won’t give away the ending but it is a fascinating read.

    I think that these ideas could have important implications for neuropsychological rehabilitation and teaching.  How many teachers and psychologists know about these techniques and use them?   The techniques would need some adaptation (learning packs of cards, shopping lists and strings of numbers is not that useful) but used properly it could be very helpful for children learning facts about the world or number facts or just developing more effective ways to pass exams.  Is anyone out there using these techniques to help children with learning problems? If so I would love to hear about it.

    Published on May 2, 2011 · Filed under: brain training, memory, neuroscience, rehabiliatation;
    2 Comments

2 Responses to “How to improve memory”

  1. [...] How to improve memory [...]

  2. “Outstanding minds are always violently attacked by the mediocrity, which is difficult to fathom that someone can refuse to prevailing prejudices blind allegiances, opting instead for a bold and honest proclamation of their own views.” A. Einstein

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