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Child Neuropsychology

A blog by Dr Jonathan Reed

  • I work a lot with children and young people who have suffered a brain injury.  It is one of the most devastating conditions.  Brain injury often results in changes to personality, to memory, to social ability and sometime to physical disability.  It often occurs to normally developing individuals.  Because brain cells do not repair themselves there is no cure and it is a case of living with and adapting to the condition.  I have noticed however that there is one area of functioning that seems to be preserved and often actually enhanced following a brain injury and that is creativity.  Although the brain can not repair itself new neural pathways can develop which I believe can allow new talents to emerge or create a different way of seeing the world.  I have worked with several young people who have gone on to A level and university to do photography or Art despite their disability.   One person I know, Spencer Aston is working as a freelance photographer. He takes photos from a unique perspective in my opinion.  I have come across other individuals who have become artists following a brain injury- see this site for examples.   Also in terms of music there it the amazing Melody Gardot who makes beautiful music  despite or perhaps as a result of suffering a severe brain injury as a teenager.  Other singers I really like and who have suffered severe brain injury and recovered to do some great work include Marc Almond (details of injury here) and Edwin Collins (details of recovery here).   All these people are inspiring.  The message is that while having a severe brain injury can be devastating there is hope and possibly new futures.  I would encourage young people with brain injury or their parents to explore different potential creative opportunities.  I would also love to hear of other stories of people with a brain injury who have developed creatively following their injury.

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  • One of the most distressing symptoms for many of the children and young people I see clinically after a traumatic brain injury or stroke is the physical disability caused by the neurological injury. Most parents, children and young people hold out most hope for a physical recovery. The physical disability is the most visible symptom to the patient, their families and to other people. At present the main therapy to help with this is physiotherapy. Physiotherapy requires repeated exercise to try and improve physical function. Recent research has shown that physiotherapy is more effective in treating adult stoke patients than no therapy, although the type of physiotherapy used didn’t seem to make a difference. However, even with a disorder as physically treatable as stroke about 50-60% of individuals do not make a full physical recovery. I think the numbers for TBI based injury who don’t make a recovery would probably be higher. The other problem with a behavioural based phsyiotherapy is that it is difficult to maintain particularly for children and young people with neurological based injury. The exercises tend to be repetitive, lack meaning and often require the individual to remember and practice the therapy on a daily basis. This is a particular problem when children are discharged from hospital and may only see the physiotherapist on a weekly basis. An additional problem maintaining therapy occurs for children and adults with other neurological symptoms such as executive function difficulties (i.e difficulties with initiation, self monitoring, motivation etc) and memory difficulties. Therefore there is a need to develop other treatment approaches. A special edition of the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation out last month is devoted to innovative ways to treat neurologically based physical disability. These are mainly based on non invasive brain stimulation. One approach is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. This is based on stimulating the brain using powerful magnets. The neuroscience behind this is explained in detail here. It is believed to enhance the process of plasticity. In terms of outcome this article concludes that ‘There has been some modest functional improvement reported after some NBS interventions, however the longer-term clinical benefits remain unproven’.

    Another approach discussed in this article is the use of robotics e.g using a robotic arm/ exoskeleton to deliver the physical therapy. This takes the effort away from the person and could deliver very precise exercises. It also seems to rely on implicit (rather than explicit) learning which is the way that individuals with brain injury seem to learn best – see this post. The authors describe the outcome research as follows “In a systematic review of eight robotic neurorehabilitation trials, Prange and colleagues concluded that robotic therapies led to long-term improvement in motor control by increasing speed, muscle activation patterns and movement selection, although no consistent benefit was found with ADL (Activities of Daily Living) measures (note the authors explain why this may be the case). There could also be the possibility of combining the robotics with virtual reality and computer games to make physical rehabilitation motivating, fun and engaging. This would make it much more likely for children and young people to benefit from the therapy.

    In all it is still very early in terms of this research to recommend new types of treatment now, but it does show that there are a number of new techniques on the horizon. These techniques would be especially relevant for children and young people with a neurologically based physical disability.

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